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“Am I neurodivergent?” Take a free neurodivergent quiz

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“Am I neurodivergent?” Take a free neurodivergent quiz

Ever wonder why you get lost in a daydream for hours or need silence in a noisy world? You may get hyper-focused on tasks you love or struggle to stay organized. 

We all pursue this world differently, and that’s totally okay. There’s a wide range of ways that people’s brains can function, and neurodiversity helps us appreciate this instead of focusing on a single ‘typical’ way of thinking.

So, how to understand if your brain works differently? For such purposes, we can use the neurodivergent quiz as a valuable tool for self-discovery. It can provide some insights and help you to understand whether you are neurodivergent. 

While online neurodiversity tests can’t diagnose, they can be a starting point for better understanding and accepting ourselves.

Exploring neurodiversity and taking a quiz can lead to some unexpected discoveries about ourselves. But most importantly, this knowledge can help us build a stronger sense of self-awareness. Are you ready? Let’s do it.

Neurodivergent: what is it?

Neurodiversity is not an official diagnosis or medical concept but an umbrella term used to describe the wide range of ways our brains can work. It has two types: neurodivergent and neurotypical.

What’s the meaning of neurodivergent? Such people process information, interact with the world, and behave in ways that are not considered typical for our society. For example, people who live with ADHD symptoms.

Some may learn at a faster pace, some prefer things to be highly organized, and others…well, they might have a million tabs open in their minds at once. None of those are wrong; it’s just how our brains roll, it’s just different.

Author and activist Steve Silberman says, “Neurodiversity is the future of innovation and progress.” Isn’t that an exciting prospect?

While neurodiversity applies to everyone, it’s often used in the context of specific conditions, such as:

  • Autism Spectrum Disorder (ASD)
  • Attention Deficit Hyperactivity Disorder (ADHD)
  • Autism and ADHD Overlap (AuDHD)
  • Dyslexia
  • Dyspraxia
  • Tourette Syndrome

The reason behind neurodivergent disorders is a puzzle for science. It seems like genes probably play a part and, maybe, how brains develop differently. 

Even the environment we’re in when we’re young might have something to do with it. For example, childhood trauma might cause ADHD and other conditions.

In fact, up to 1 in 5 people around the world are neurodivergent. Wonder if you are one of them? Take our “Am I neurodivergent” quiz to explore this aspect of yourself!

I mentioned neurotypical before, but I haven’t expanded on it yet. So what is neurotypical, and how does it differ from neurodivergent?

Neurodivergent & Neurotypical

We already know that people with neurodivergent brains experience information processing, social interaction, sensory input, and learning in ways that vary from what’s considered “typical.”

On the other hand, neurotypical brains function in a way that’s more typical for our society. Of course, this doesn’t mean neurotypical people are exactly the same, but they generally go about things in a way most people expect.

Okay, does it still sound fuzzy? Let’s use everyday examples. Imagine bedtime:

  • Neurotypical: Lights out, goes to sleep.
  • Neurodivergent: The brain is stuck on replay, analyzing every conversation from the day, convinced they misspoke somewhere or everyone seems to be judging every move. (This is a common experience for people with anxiety, a neurodivergence.)

Now, picture lunch break:

  • Neurotypical: Doesn’t mind the background noise of the cafeteria while eating a sandwich.
  • Neurodivergent: Might pack a lunch to eat in a quiet place to escape the overwhelming noise. They might also choose familiar, easy-to-eat foods to minimize sensory overload. 

There are some interesting differences here. Also, you may notice here some of the symptoms of being neurodivergent, about which we will talk in the next section.

Traits of neurodivergent

Examples of neurodivergence can vary but often appear early in life. Here are some of the most common:

  • Needing a little extra time to process what people are saying.
  • Getting very interested in one thing or having trouble focusing at all.
  • Being overstimulated. What does overstimulation feel like? It’s being more aware of sounds, lights, smells, or other things around them.
  • Learning in their own way, outside the box.
  • Having a lot of energy that they need to release physically sometimes.

Along with this, they can also be:

  • Amazing problem solvers.
  • Creative and artistic.
  • Have unique sensory experiences.

It’s important to remember that these are just general signs, and not everyone who is neurodivergent will experience all of them. Taking our neurodivergent quiz below might help you determine whether it aligns with your experience.

Note: While online tests can’t diagnose neurodivergence, they can be a great way to explore your experiences and consider seeking professional help.

“Am I neurodivergent?” Take a free neurodivergent quiz for adults

Hey, we are finally here! We’ve been exploring different neurodivergent experiences. Maybe you’ve seen some reflections of yourself in them. Ready to see if you might be neurodivergent? Let’s answer your questions and do a quick self-assessment to learn more.

Is this neurodivergent quiz right for you?

This short test is designed to help you understand if you might be neurodivergent. It won’t diagnose you, but the questions can give you a sense of how you experience the world compared to someone with a “typical” brain.

If the quiz results suggest you might be neurodivergent, a mental health professional can provide a diagnosis and recommend support options.

Can this quiz be trusted?

This test, developed along with a psychologist, can identify symptoms of neurodivergence. However, it’s not a substitute for a professional diagnosis. It’s more like a conversation starter than a final say. 

It can’t diagnose anything specific within the neurodivergent spectrum, and “neurodivergent” itself isn’t a diagnosis but a broad term.

If something in your test results catches your attention, you can always discuss it with a doctor or therapist.

Instruction for getting prepared

Okay, we can begin. Here are 3 steps to get started:

  • Answer honestly: Take your time and answer the questions thoughtfully.
  • Check your results: See how the answers match how you’re feeling.
  • Talk to a professional: Share your results with someone you trust who can help you learn more (optional).

This quiz consists of 20 questions. Remember, a positive result does not mean a proper diagnosis. All you need to do is grab a pen and paper so you can write down your thoughts to keep track of answers. And take your time! Read each question carefully before answering.

Scoring Rules: Each question consists of 4 answers: “Definitely Agree,” “Slightly Agree,” “Definitely Disagree,” and “Slightly Disagree.”

Use a 0-2 scale to rate how much you can relate:

  • Definitely Agree – 2 points
  • Slightly Agree – 1 point
  • Definitely Disagree – 0 points
  • Slightly Disagree – 0 point
Am I neurodivergent?

Neurodivergent quiz

No pressure, just be honest. Answer each question honestly. This neurodivergent test takes about 5 minutes.

1. Mostly, I find it challenging to stay focused and still for a long time

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

2. I often find math in my head hard 

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

3. Sometimes, the world can feel extra loud, bright, or even ticklish

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

4.  Sticking to my routine is very important to me

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

5. Most of the time, I find myself having a hard time recognizing sarcasm or jokes

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

6. I have a good eye for catching little things in most cases

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

7. Spelling can be a challenge for me at times

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

8. Mostly, keeping track of my belongings can be a challenge for me

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

9. Sometimes, my brain can be a bit slow in finding the right word

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

10. People say I’m rude sometimes, but I don’t mean to be

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

11. Often, I find time management a challenging task.

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

12. In most cases, I find spending time alone to be refreshing after being out

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

13. I see problems as opportunities to be creative

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

14. I can get into something only when I find something interesting

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

15. Most of the times, eye contact feel a bit awkward for me

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

16. Things can get frustrating for me quickly at times

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

17. Telling left from right can often take me a moment

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

18. Mostly, I might say things out loud a bit quicker than others

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

19. Making friends is a really challenge for me

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

20. I mostly struggle with specific phobias or fears

  • Definitely agree
  • Slightly agree
  • Definitely disagree
  • Slightly disagree

Let’s see your results for the neurodivergent quiz

Okay, you did it! Great. Now, it’s time to count points for each answer according to the scoring rules.

(0-6 range) You may be neurotypical

Your symptoms of neurodivergence are subtle. Based on your answers, it appears you likely fall within the neurotypical spectrum. This means your way of thinking and behaving aligns with what’s most common.

But remember, if you have any concerns or questions about neurodiversity or if you think you might be neurodivergent, it’s always a good idea to talk with a mental health professional or your doctor. 

Meanwhile, I have prepared some helpful tips to make you feel boosted every day:

  • Start your day with a positive affirmation: Take a few minutes in the morning to repeat a positive statement about yourself or your goals for the day. This can help set the tone for a productive and optimistic day.
  • Schedule time for breaks: Don’t try to power through the day without any breaks. Get up and move around every hour or so, take deep breaths, or step outside for fresh air. These short breaks help you stay focused and energized throughout the day.
  • Learn something new: Challenge yourself mentally by learning a new skill or taking up a new hobby. This can help keep your mind sharp and boost your overall well-being.
  • Practice gratitude: Take time each day to reflect on what you’re grateful for. This can help you maintain a positive outlook and appreciate the good things in your life.

(7-16 range) You may have some symptoms of neurodivergent 

If your score is 7-16 points, that might show some signs that overlap with neurodivergent conditions. 

This is just a quick check, though. If your score is here and you mostly agree with the questions, talking to a therapist could be a good next step. We also advise you to take the ADHD test for further exploration. Here are some tips for moving forward: 

  • Talk to someone: Sharing your thoughts and feelings with trusted ones can be incredibly helpful. They can offer support and different perspectives and potentially connect you with resources.
  • Create a routine: Having a consistent daily schedule, even a loose one, provides structure and predictability. This can reduce anxiety and improve focus throughout the day.
  • Minimize distractions: When concentrating on a task, turn off notifications, silence your phone, or use browser extensions to block distracting websites. This may help you stay on track and avoid getting overwhelmed.

(17-40 range) You may be likely neurodivergent

Your unique way of thinking and interacting with others might suggest you’re neurodivergent. This simply means your brain works a little bit differently, which can also be a strength. Many successful people are neurodivergent.

If you’d like to explore ways to optimize your learning and work environments, consider talking to a qualified mental health professional. They can help you understand your strengths and preferences and suggest strategies for thriving in different settings. 

There’s no pressure to get a diagnosis, but it can be a helpful tool for some people.

In addition, you can also find tips on managing possible signs of neurodivergence:

  • Mini-wins: Break down large goals into smaller, achievable tasks. That will keep you motivated and reinforce positive progress.
  • Optimize your environment: Create a workspace that minimizes distractions and caters to your sensory preferences. This could include noise-canceling headphones, fidget toys, or specific lighting.
  • Communicate your needs: Don’t be afraid to tell others how you best function. Talk to colleagues about needing quiet time to focus or explain how specific communication methods work best for you.
  • Schedule “you” time: Prioritize activities that recharge your batteries. Whether it’s reading, spending time in nature, or pursuing a hobby, dedicate time to activities that bring you joy.
Rychel Johnson, M.S., LCPC, comments Being neurodiverse is full of positive attributes: Your unique perspective offers so much to relationships, your career, and the world in general. Neurodiversity embraces the natural variations of the human experience and how each person’s brain works differently. Be sure to practice self-care strategies that focus on your unique needs, such as reducing sensory overload and setting boundaries to ensure you can rest and recharge. Engaging in activities you enjoy is also essential in nurturing yourself.

Great work! 

Here we go, you made it! I hope the neurodivergent quiz has brought you some of the answers you were looking for and provided insights into your well-being. Remember, this is just one step on your journey.

If the results suggest you might be neurodivergent, consider talking to a qualified mental health professional who can offer a diagnosis and personalized support. They can help you explore your strengths and develop strategies to navigate any challenges you might face. 

Remember what Steve Silberman said at the beginning of the article? That’s what I’m talking about. You’ve got this!

Rychel Johnson, M.S., LCPC photo

Reviewed by Rychel Johnson, M.S., LCPC

Rychel Johnson, M.S., LCPC, is a licensed clinical professional counselor. She owns a private practice specializing in anxiety tre...